Rahab & Home

No pictures today. It isn’t appropriate.

We left Murchison Falls this morning, stopping first at Masindi and at some point not found on a map to say good bye to our South Sudan friends. It’s hard to think about the contrast between our homes, each one of us going to something different. After letting them go we continued on to Kampala where we dropped our safari guide off.

Philip arranged for us to visit a home for victims of human trafficking. The shelter seemed to be in a ghetto area of Kampala. We found Ellen or Allen, I couldn’t understand Philip’s pronunciation of the letters as he spelled her name. She was the assistant director of the program. Ellen (or Allen) and I seemed to hit it off. After sharing a bit of our backgrounds she suggested that I move to Kampala and help pass laws that would make it easier to prosecute those buying the girls.

As we talked I asked Ellen (still uncertain, it may be Allen) about the ages of the girls that they have helped. She said that right now they have an 11 year old in their program as the youngest. However, they have helped a 9 year old as well. I’m not certain of the number of girls that they can shelter. In addition to the shelter program, they walk the streets to do outreach.

She mentioned that she had just come back from the U.S. She had been here to attend a conference on trafficking and prostitution. For some reason I happened to mention the name of a friend of mine in the federal government who trains on these issues. She said he was one of the presenters at the conference she attended, driving home the idea that it is really a small world.

After saying good bye to the staff at Rahab House we started toward Entebbe where Philip would drop us off for our flight to Amsterdam. Before going to the airport, though, we have one stop to make. We must find dinner. Philip chose the place for our last meal together…Pizza Hut.

Philip…seluganda. So long for now, my friend. Thank you for the hard work you put into making the last two weeks happen and for the work you are doing in Africa.

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